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Takin it to the streets

May 28

I’ll begin by apologizing for it being so long between posts, you have certainly been neglected, but not forgotten. As it often does, life in general has gotten to be more than a little crazy the last few months. There have been more occasions than I can count that I have said “I need to blog about this” however the time to do that has been elusive. Let me catch you up a bit.

I was laid off from my part time EMS job about 2 months ago, the company I was working for lost a provider contract and they made massive cuts to the number of EMTs they employed. While for a minute or two I was upset about it, I never had any intentions of staying there after school, simply put, it wasn’t an organization that I felt was going to foster my development as a paramedic. The very same day I found out I was laid off, I got a phone call from the Clinical Coordinator of my Paramedic School – it seems the Chief of the school had been impressed with my work ethic and my initiative and was wondering if I would be interested in helping with administrative duties around the office.

It was a soft landing for me and gave me the opportunity to have some input into Paramedic School, and hopefully make the experience a little more enriching for my classmates. It caused a few ripples in class initially, but once my classmates figured out I really was trying to make class better for us all they smoothed out. The job is as many hours as I want to work, and the pay is better then what I was making working a bus, how could I turn that down?

One of the side effects of taking on such a responsibility has been a serious decrease in the amount of “free time” I have. Towards the end of didactic I was often having to choose between a couple hours of sleep and a couple hours of study time. I usually choose study time, my body however, would choose sleep and I’d awake a few hours later with a drool covered textbook page stuck to my check.

As class wound down there was a general feeling of fatigue setting in among my classmates – 9 months of classroom at least 12 often 20 hours a week and we were it would be fair to say “over it.” The final was on May 9th and for the first time in the history of my program EVERYONE who started the class finished the didactic phase.

As we all enter our Field Internship I’ve heard more than one of my classmates say – holy hell can we go back to class?

I’ve completed 50 hours into the internship post class (which puts me at 150 total) and while I have seen tremendous strides from hour 101 it is clear to me how VERY far I have to go, as well as how little I actually know.

In my first shift I was assigned a “homework” assignment – a paper written on the Pathogenesis of Hypertension in Diabetics – fascinating stuff and so extremely complex that I could spend the next three weeks reading about it with a medical dictionary sitting beside to look up the words I don’t understand in the articles and still not even scratch the surface.

Shift two gave me the opportunity to find the drug we carry on the box that has an off label use to relieve esophageal spasms – thinking through my limited understanding of pharm I came up with Nitro (wrong) Mag (wrong again) and Benadryl (due it’s anti cholinergic properties – wrong again) I finally ended up with the answer – Glucagon… but it took me many hours of searching to find it – due to the fact that no one understands exactly how Glucagon works in that way.

Shift three we ran a multiple stabbing – a tourniquet a few IV’s and lots of diesel and we got him to the hospital.

Shift four was with a new medic – she wouldn’t let me do very much, and I was rather disappointed to not be allowed to be more hands on. It was after that shift that I recognized how difficult it must be for a medic to have a paramedic student, how confident they have to be ability to let their student screw up just shy of the point of doing harm to the patient and then stepping in at the last minute to intervene before it was too late.

Shift five a chest pain call was the highlight of the night and for the first time in 150 hours in a busy system – I ran a call that I didn’t totally screw the pooch on – not that there wasn’t room for improvement – I’m a firm believer that there is always room for improvement – but after the call the conversation went something like this…

I walked out to the ambulance bay and awaited my preceptors feedback – which is often a “painful and eye opening” experience for me – and instead of the way he usually starts the feedback with “how did that call go?” he walks over and says “Where the hell has THAT paramedic student been all this time? Bring him back and run all your call like that”

It was a small victory for me – but it was the first time I ran a call and didn’t wonder “what the hell did I get myself into” It was the first time on the street I felt like wait maybe I CAN do this.

There are 40 more hours of rides this week – I’ll try to do a better job keeping you posted.

 

Posted by on May 28, 2012 in Paramedic School, Personal

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