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Machines that go bing

January 16

During a recent class I had one of my “illusions of being a paramedic” shattered it was illuminating for me and bears repeating. I’ve heard many of my partners say treat the patient not the (insert machine that goes bing here). I guess while I heard it I never really understood what they meant, until class the other night when one of our instructors said “you should never use a machine that goes bing without knowing what that machine is going to tell you.”

WHAT ?!? Wait just a minute – you mean I get to finally use all these shiny gizmos in the back of the ambulance and more than that, understand what they are telling me and I don’t really need them ? Talk about a bubble bursting…

The more I thought about what he said, the more sense it made. I have next to no experience at all deciding which tools to use when and even when I do get to make the decision now, its with a preceptor “holding my hand” to make sure I’m on the right track. What little practice I do have I’ve ALWAYS been asked to justify why I wanted to use the monitor, or the glucometer or the capnography – What did you find in your assessment that leads you to believe that it’s necessary to use that particular piece of equipment. If I could answer that question to their satisfaction (which occasionally I could not) the next question was what do you expect to see when you use it.

The first few times I was asked that question I was scratching my head thinking well isn’t that why I’m using the machine in the first place to find out what it says?

Over the years I’ve developed a pretty good sense of “sick, not yet sick, not sick” based on my assessment – it isn’t 100% for me or likely for anyone else within those first few moments – and I base my treatment decisions on those findings – however protocol says all patients complaining of chest pain get a 12 lead – whether I think they are really sick from a cardiac cause or a trapped gas bubble – so I tried that for an answer

I want to put the patient on the monitor because they have chest pain – ok go ahead – what do you expect the 12 lead to look like? uhhhhhhhhhhhhh I don’t really know but the protocol book says we have to do one for all chest pain patients – take a seat = I’ll run the rest of this call and we’ll talk about it later

Damn it – how am I supposed to know what the monitor is going to show before I even have the electrodes in place? I was frustrated and I’ll admit for a few minutes I thought it was haze the paramedic student stuff.

After the patient was dropped off at the ED my preceptor came out and explained it to me – I spent the next several hours kicking myself in the keister for not putting the pieces together. It wasn’t paramedic student hazing, it wasn’t pushing the student to figure stuff out – it was basic and something I should have already realized.

His logic was a simple as it was eloquent – The conversation went something like this:

Preceptor: When you checked the patient’s pulse – tell me what you learned

Me: They had a pulse, it was strong,  and regular their skin was warm and dry and based on the fact that he had a radial pulse his pressure was likely above 90

Excellent – now tell me what if his pulse had been irregular

I would have suspected he had a cardiac issue – most likely a-fib

Good – what about a thready pulse?

Again I would have suspected a cardiac issue – although lots of things could cause a weak thready pulse, but based on his complaint I would have thought cardiac

Good – now what if the patient’s skin had been pale, cool and diaphoretic?

With his c/o being chest pain – I would have suspected MI

You got all that info from a pulse?

Yes – that and his complaint

So – since this patient had chest pain with a strong regular pulse and pink warm dry skin was it likely he was having a cardiac issue?

We can’t really say based on just that information – we can’t even rule out an MI after a 12 lead that takes hospital tests

True – but based on his presentation and the rest of your assessment did you suspect he was having a life threatening cardiac issue ?

Honestly, no

I didn’t either – so based on that information – what did you expect to see on the monitor?

and then it clicked for me…

I didn’t expect to see any significant changes on his 12 lead in all honesty

Then that’s the answer to what do you expect to see, just like with the irregular pulse you would have expected to see an irregular rhythm or non perfusing beats, or possibly an ineffective rhythm with the thready pulse or significant ST segment changes if he had been pale cool and diaphoretic… are you following me?

Yes was my answer (although it was directed at the top of my boots) – I felt stupid that I didn’t piece all that together.

When you were an EMT everything was black and white – now that you are training to be a paramedic you have to remember everything is in varying shades of grey. Yes we have more tools to use, but your assessment as a medic is no different than your assessment was as a basic – you will still form your clinical opinion based on the patient’s presentation not what the machines say. If your patient says they have sharp 10 out of 10 substernal chest pain that is non reproducible, radiates to the left shoulder and jaw, is nauseous, vomiting , pale, cool and diaphoretic and they tell you they think they are dying and the 12 lead shows a normal sinus rhythm at 88 does that mean they aren’t having an MI? Of course not. If you have an asymptomatic young adult cyclist with a heart rate of 50 are you going to treat him for bradycardia just because the monitor says so?

No his clinical presentation would tell me that’s likely normal for him.

Treat the patient not the machines, always know why you are using the machine and have an idea based on your assessment what that machine is going to say before you look at it, and remember what those readings on the machines do and don’t mean. They are, in a nutshell, extra information that helps you reach a conclusion but they are not in almost every single case what you are going to base your treatment on.

It was so simple I feel silly for not realizing it ahead of time. Yet another valuable lesson learned on the path to the disco path.

 

Posted by on January 16, 2012 in EMS, EMT, Paramedic School

3 Comments

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3 responses to “Machines that go bing

  1. Joe Paczkowski

    January 16, 2012 at 13:35

    I think the “know what to expect” is distinctly different from “treat the patient, not the machine.” To demonstrate that, what sort of red flags are thrown up if the machine doesn’t tell you what you were expecting to see? Are the red flags only restricted to some sort of malfunction of the machine, or can the red flags include things such as missing an exam finding or misinterpreting the exam findings?

     
    • hotlightsandcoldsteel

      January 16, 2012 at 13:45

      You make an EXCELLENT point Joe – Unexpected findings on the machine are yes potentially cause to suspect machine malfunction, but it would seem to me that it would more likely indicate missing a pertinent exam finding, or arriving at the wrong differential diagnosis based on your findings. As an absolute noob with regards to machines – unexpected findings it would seem to me would be a good time to reevaluate what you thought you found and the significance of those findings – back to the initial stages of ruling out life threats and going from there. Would you agree?

       
      • Joe Paczkowski

        January 19, 2012 at 14:40

        I definitely agree, and it’s why I hate the cliche about “treat the patient, not the machine.” As you astutely commented in the post, what’s the purpose of using a machine if you already know what it’s going to say. Similarly, why use a machine if you’re going to ignore it if it doesn’t tell you what you are expecting to see?

         

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