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Turned loose on the street…

November 23

This week we started our stage 1 ambulance rides (100 hours with the goal of “observing”) Learning how the system works, where things are in the ambulance, how to manage scenes, hand off reports etc – observe how the paramedics we will be riding with do things.

Before we talk about how the rides have gone thus far and what I’ve learned specifically about myself. Let me explain a few things… The service we are riding with is my DREAM job – I want to work there so badly I can taste it. My program is “sponsored” by that particular organization and is considered a year long job interview – impress and perform and you are in… Fall flat, have a crappy attitude, demonstrate you are not up to their high standards and you’re toast.

Knowing all that creates A LOT of self imposed pressure. I want to impress, I want to show confidence, I want to sit in the FRONT seat of that ambulance.

As someone who generally performs better under pressure – I was ready for my moment in the sun so to speak.

Classes to this point have focused mostly on skills – so for all intents and purposes I am a Basic EMT who knows how to do advanced skills: I know how to intubate, perform a cricothyrotomy, administer medications, calculate doses, apply CPAP and capnography, start IV’s , apply the monitor and name the dog in the rhythm strip, hell I even know how to dart a chest… The trouble is I don’t know WHEN to do any of these things – OK granted some of them are obvious – but formulating a treatment plan at this stage of class is still limited to basic knowledge and basic skills.

Ok enough background… Let’s get to the clinicals shall we ?

I went in to my first ride thinking the plan was to basically observe and practice the skills I had learned and SEE when they are used in the field. I met my preceptor and he agreed – Any procedure we need to do I want you to perform; help me at my direction through the shift. Hell I can do that… I mean in reality that’s what I do now everyday when I go to work right ? I knew how to prepare for all the procedures and set them up for my paramedic partner – the difference this time would be, instead of handing the syringe and vial (so he can check medication and that I drew the correct amount up) I drew up to the medic and him handing me back the vial to toss, he’s going to hand me the syringe so I can administer the medication… Cool.

The first 10 hour shift passed with no real acuity to any of our patients, but I helped as I could.

My preceptor evaluated me as a basic and as he expected a paramedic student 2 months into classes on his first ride should be evaluated, giving me very high marks on my evaluation and told me I would be a good medic. These words were music to my ears… I had impressed him and he let me know it – NICE. I was disappointed in his evaluation though… Why?

When all you tell me is great job, you offer no room for improvement, no suggestions for how to get better, no suggestions on expanding my scope or things that I will need to do better or different as a medic. That doesn’t help me, it doesn’t challenge me, it doesn’t force me to grow.

The next day I showed up for my second shift it went a little different.

OK that’s an understatement it was ALOT different….How?

That’s Friday’s post.

 

 

Posted by on November 23, 2011 in EMS, EMT, Paramedic School, Uncategorized

1 Comment

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One response to “Turned loose on the street…

  1. CCC

    November 24, 2011 at 21:42

    Knowing how to perform the skills, and how to help prepare for interventions puts you far ahead of the majority of medic students 2 months into a program.

    ‘What’ and ‘how’ are important, but not as important as the ‘when.’ The ‘when’ will come with more classroom time, and experience helping the medic in the back.

    Sounds like you are doing great. Keep up the good work.

     

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